Difference between microtubules and microfilaments

Main difference

The main difference between microtubules and microfilaments is that microtubules are made up of tubulin protein units and are normally long, hollow cylinders, whereas microfilaments are produced by actin proteins and are generally double-stranded helical polymers …

Microtubules vs. Microfilaments

Microtubules are a helical structural network, while microfilaments are a double helix. Microtubules are 24 nm in diameter, while microfilaments are 7 nm in diameter. The alpha and beta subunits of the protein tubulin form microtubules; On the other hand, microfilaments are mainly composed of a contractile protein called actin protein. Microtubules resist bending forces and are rigid; on the contrary, microfilaments are relatively strong and flexible and resist fracture of the filament by tensile forces and resist buckling due to compressive forces.Microtubules help plant cells to perform their proper function, for various purposes of cell transport and mitosis; on the contrary, microfilaments help plant cells to move. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP and motor proteins; On the contrary, the proteins involved in the regulation of microfilament dynamics are the filament crosslinkers, the actin monomer-binding proteins, the actin-related protein complex 2/3 (Arp2 / 3) and the proteins that cut the filaments. Microtubules are found in basal bodies, cilia / flagella, centrioles, astral rays, and spindle fibers; on the other hand, microfilaments are produced at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane. A single microtubule contains 13 proto-filaments; conversely, microfilaments are structurally sound. Microfilaments are produced at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane. A single microtubule contains 13 proto-filaments; conversely, microfilaments are structurally sound. Microfilaments are produced at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane. A single microtubule contains 13 proto-filaments; conversely, microfilaments are structurally sound.

Comparative chart

Microtubules Microfilaments
The polymers of the tubulin protein that are part of the cytoskeleton and give shape and structure to the plant cell are microtubules. Also called actin filaments that are part of the cytoskeleton and are present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells composed of actin polymers, they are microfilaments.
Structure
Helical lattice Double helix
Diameter
24 nautical miles 7 nm
Composition
Composed of alpha and beta subunits of the protein tubulin. Made up of a contractile protein called actin protein
Force
They resist bending forces and are rigid in strength Relatively strong and flexible and resists filament fracture by tensile forces and resists buckling due to compression forces
Features
It helps plant cells to function properly, such as mitosis and various cell transport functions. Helps plant cells move
Associated proteins
MAP, + TIP and motor proteins Filament crosslinkers, actin monomer-binding proteins, actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3) complex, and filament-cutting proteins
Idea
In basal bodies, cilia / flagella, centrioles, astral rays, and spindle fibers At the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane
What are microtubules?

The polymers of the protein tubulin that are part of the cytoskeleton and give shape and structure to the plant cell are microtubules. Microtubules are 24 nm in diameter. The alpha and beta subunits of the protein tubulin form microtubules. Microtubules allow cell transport together with motor proteins and are capable of generating forces when contracting. Actin filaments and microtubules provide internal structure to the cytoskeleton and cause the cytoskeleton to alter its shape as it moves. A particular microtubule consists of thirteen proto-filaments. Actin filaments are marked with a red tint, while microtubules are marked with a green tint, and nuclei are marked with a blue tint. Microtubules form a spindle apparatus by participating in chromosomal segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Microtubules are nucleated at the centromere, which are the MTOCs (microtubule organizing centers) to form the spindle apparatus. Microtubules are found in basal bodies, cilia / flagella, centrioles, astral rays, and spindle fibers. Microtubules resist bending forces and are rigid, and allow genetic regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins. and they allow the gene regulation of transcription factors through specific expressions. They control the cellular structure in the plant body. They also provide transport for various vesicles that carry important materials to the rest of the cell. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP, and motor proteins.

What are microfilaments?

Also called actin filaments that are part of the cytoskeleton and are present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells composed of actin polymers are microfilaments. The microfilaments have a distance of almost 7 nm with a double helix coil that is coated every 37 nm. Microfilaments are mainly made up of contractile protein called actin protein and two strands in a helical structure. Microfilaments are considered the tallest fibers present in the cytoskeleton. Microfilaments are involved in cell motility such as amoeboid movement and cytokinesis. Microfilaments normally play a vital role in cell contractility, cell shape, mechanical stability, endocytosis, and exocytosis. In muscle cells, actin filaments are associated and myosin proteins produce forces to support muscular contraction of the filaments. Microfilaments are relatively strong and flexible and resist fracture of the filament by tensile forces and resist buckling due to compressive forces. Proteins present in maintaining the changing aspects of microfilaments are filament crosslinkers, actin monomer binding proteins, actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3) complex, filament cut proteins, tracking protein filament end, spiked filament – end cappers such as CapG and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments are produced at the interface of the plasma gel-plasma sol and below the cell membrane, and they are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament barbed end cappers such as CapG and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament barbed end cappers such as CapG and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3), filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound. filament cutting proteins, filament end tracking protein, spiked filament end cappers such as CapG, and depolymerizing actin proteins. Microfilaments occur at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane, and are structurally sound.

Key differences

  1. Microtubules are a helical structural network, while microfilaments are a double helix.
  2. Microtubules are 24 nm in diameter, while microfilaments are 7 nm in diameter.
  3. The alpha and beta subunits of the protein tubulin are made up of microtubules; On the other hand, the contractile protein known as actin protein mainly produces microfilaments.
  4. Microtubules resist bending forces and are rigid; in contrast, microfilaments are relatively strong and flexible and resist fracture of the filament by tensile forces and resist buckling due to compressive forces.
  5. Microtubules help plant cells to perform their proper function, as various purposes of cell transport and mitosis; on the contrary, microfilaments help plant cells to move.
  6. The associated proteins that regulate microtubule dynamics are MAP, + TIP and motor proteins; conversely, the proteins involved in regulating microfilament dynamics are filament crosslinkers, actin monomer binding proteins, actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2 / 3) complex, and filament-cutting proteins.
  7. Microtubules are found in basal bodies, cilia / flagella, centrioles, astral rays, and spindle fibers; on the other hand, microfilaments are produced at the plasma gel-plasma sol interface and below the cell membrane.
  8. A single microtubule contains 13 proto-filaments; conversely, microfilaments are structurally sound.
Final Thought

The above discussion concludes that microtubules are made up of tubulin proteins, long and hollow casts, while microfilaments are made up of actin proteins and are double-stranded helical polymers.

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