Language

Differences between Have and Have Got

-Have- and -Have got- are two English verbs that have the same meaning and their translation into Spanish refers to owning, that is, owning something. However, despite having the same meaning, their uses and applications are different. Therefore, below we will present the differences between –have- and -have got- based on their use and supporting us with different examples to dispel possible doubts that our readers may have.

have

To begin with, -Have- is a verb whose translation into Spanish is “to have” and refers to owning something. Thus, the verb -have- can be used to talk about relationships, illnesses and characteristics, being a verb widely used in American English. For affirmative sentences, the formula is very simple: subject + have + complement, while for negative sentences, the verb -have- requires the accompaniment of the auxiliary verb “do”. Likewise, for interrogative sentences it also requires the auxiliary verb “do”.

On the other hand, in the past, you can use “have” (conjugation: “had”). In addition, -have- can be used in the present continuous to refer to actions that are being carried out in the present without indicating a time of completion. Finally, this can also function as an auxiliary verb in the present perfect and in the past perfect, although in this case the verb -have- is placed in the past (had).

Here are some examples:

  • I have a flu (I have a cold), refers to having a disease (affirmative sentence).
  • She has a boyfriend, refers to having a relationship (affirmative sentence).
  • He has a new car (He has a new car), refers to some possession (affirmative sentence).
  • I do not have money (I have no money), accompanied by the auxiliary “do” (negative sentence)
  • Do you have a car? (Do you have a car?) accompanied by the auxiliary “Do” (interrogative sentence).

have got

We can say that -have got- is a verb whose translation into Spanish is “to have” and refers to having something in property. The verb -have got- can also be used to talk about relationships, illnesses and characteristics, and is also a widely used verb in British English. Likewise, -have got- is often used in colloquial language and often in the short or abbreviated form.

Similarly, -have got- is only used in the simple present tense, since it cannot be conjugated in the past tense. It is worth noting that negative and interrogative sentences with the verb -have got- do not require auxiliary verbs.

Here are some examples:

  • I have got a car. (I have a car), affirmative sentence in present simple.
  • I haven’t got a car. (I don’t have a car), negative sentence.
  • Have you got a car? (Do you have a car?), interrogative sentence.

According to the examples cited, the following differences between –have- and –have got- are presented:

  • -Have- is used in the simple present and past while -have got- is only used in the simple present, since it does not have a conjugation in the past.
  • -Have- is used more frequently in American English while -have got- is used more frequently in British English.
  • Interrogative and negative sentences with -have- require the auxiliary verb “do” while interrogative and negative sentences with -have got- do not require auxiliary verbs.
  • -Have- can function as an auxiliary verb in present perfect and past perfect while -have got- cannot function as an auxiliary verb.

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