Difference between glucose and dextrose

Main difference

The main difference between glucose and dextrose is that glucose contains optical isomers in both L and D forms, whereas dextrose contains only optical isomers in D form.

Glucose vs. dextrose

Glucose is the type of pure sugar that has the molecular formula C 6 H 12 O 6 ; on the other hand, dextrose is the second name for glucose in form D that has the same molecular formula. Glucose can appear both in optical isomers and in mirror images; on the other hand, dextrose can only be present in an optical isomeric form. Glucose comes in D form and L form; on the opposite side, dextrose can only occur in the D form.

Glucose can come in all forms of carbohydrates; on the other hand, dextrose is found in some types of starches. Glucose can rotate polarized light in both left and right directions; On the other side of the coin, dextrose can turn polarized light only in the right direction. The L form of glucose is less abundant and the D form is more abundant in nature; on the other hand, dextrose is more abundant in nature.

Glucose can be found in the form of enantiomers; on the other hand, dextrose cannot be seen as enantiomers. Glucose tends to have a negative connotation in food products compared to dextrose. Glucose is the main source of energy in metabolic activities; On the other side of the coin, dextrose is the natural form of glucose.

Comparative chart

Glucose Dextrose
Glucose is pure sugar that has a molecular formula of C 6 H 12 O 6. Dextrose is a common name used for the D form of glucose.
Different types
It is found in form D and form L It is in the D form of glucose.
Rotation of polarized light
D-glucose can turn polarized light to the right direction and L-glucose can turn light to the left You can rotate the light to the left orientation only
Idea
It can be obtained from all forms of carbohydrates. It can only be derived from starches.
Abundance
D-glucose is more abundantly present, but L-glucose is less abundantly present It is more present in nature
Enantiomers
It is present as enantiomers. It is not present as enantiomers.
Optical isomers
It has two optical isomers Has a single optical isomer
What is glucose?

Glucose is the simplest monosaccharide that is used for the formation of many other essential polysaccharides. It is the sweetest carbohydrate that dissolves easily in water solvents. Glucose is the chemical formula C 6 H 12 O 6 . It has two optical isomers, including the D form and the L form. Therefore, it can occur as enantiomers. It can be obtained from all types of carbohydrates.

D-glucose and L-glucose are the mirror image of each other. Both are known as aldehyde-comprising compounds. These mirror images can be enantiomers. D-glucose is more abundantly present in nature compared to L-glucose. Glucose can cause rotation of in-plane polarized light. The D shape makes the light turn to the right, while the L shape makes the light turn to the left.

There are many uses for glucose in different fields of industry. It is used to make different ingredients and other sweet-tasting foods. These uses are due to the fact that it is more present in nature. It is also used in the medical field for the treatment of different diseases. It is used to treat hypoglycemia characterized by low levels of glucose or sugar in the blood.

What is dextrose?

Dextrose is referred to as another common name for the D form of glucose. It is also very sweet and easily soluble in water solvents. It is the monosaccharide that is used for the manufacture of other different essential polysaccharides. It has the same chemical formula as glucose and tastes sweet. It has a single optical isomer in the form of D-glucose. That is why it is never present in the form of enantiomers. It is found and can be obtained from all types of starches.

Dextrose is the mirror image of the L-form of glucose. It is also an aldehyde-containing monosaccharide. But they are not called enantiomers. It can also cause plane-polarized light to rotate in the right direction just like D-glucose. It is also present in abundance in nature. It is also on the market in both liquid and powder form.

There are many other uses for dextrose in different fields of industry. It is used as an essential ingredient in packaged foods because it is readily available. It is only 20% less sweet than sucrose drinks. It is also used to raise blood sugar levels very quickly. It is also important in the medical field. It is also used to relate to hypoglycemia.

Key differences

  1. Glucose comes in D form and L form; on the other hand, dextrose occurs only in D form.
  2. Glucose can be found in the form of enantiomers; on the other hand, dextrose cannot be found as enantiomers.
  3. Glucose has two optical isomers; On the other side of the coin, dextrose has only one optical isomer.
  4. Glucose is pure sugar that has the same molecular formula6 H 12 O 6 ; On the opposite side, dextrose is the second common name for D-glucose.
  5. L-glucose is less abundantly present, but D-glucose is more abundantly present in nature; on the other hand, dextrose is more abundantly present in the environment.
  6. Glucose can be obtained from all forms of carbohydrates; on the other hand, dextrose can be derived from starches.
  7. D-glucose causes the rotation of the polarized light in the right direction, and the L-shape of glucose causes the rotation of the polarized plane in the left direction; on the opposite side, dextrose can rotate plane-polarized light in the right direction.
  8. Glucose is the vital source of energy for various cellular activities; On the other side of the coin, dextrose is simply the natural form of glucose.
  9. The glucose used in the labeling of food products has a negative connotation; On the other side of the coin, dextrose is used for flavoring purposes.
Final Thought

The above discussion concludes that both glucose and dextrose are the type of sugar. Glucose has two optical isomers that are mirror images of each other; on the other hand, dextrose has a single optical isomer that is the mirror image of the L-form of glucose.

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