Science

Difference between specific heat and heat capacity

Main difference

Heat is a form of energy, when two objects interact, the passage of this energy from one body to another is very likely. Thermal energy is directly proportional to temperature, which means that the increase in temperature will automatically cause an increase in thermal energy within the body and vice versa. Both terms, specific heat and heat capacity, are widely used in thermodynamics, since both are used to provide the energy required to increase the temperature of an object. Specific heat and heat capacity are quite similar to each other with an additional variable difference in specific heat, although many people use these terms interchangeably, as their concept is collectively described as “specific heat capacity.”C ) or 1 Kelvin, while specific heat is the amount of heat required to increase the temperature of a substance than a mass of 1 kg or 1 g by 1 degree Celsius (° C ) or 1 Kelvin.

Comparative chart

Specific heat Heat capacity
Definition Specific heat is the amount of heat required to increase the temperature of a substance that has a mass of 1 kg or 1 g by 1 degree Celsius (° C) or 1 Kelvin. Heat capacity is the amount of heat required to increase the temperature of a substance to 1 degree Celsius (° C) or 1 Kelvin.
Mass Specific heat is directly proportional to the mass of the object or substance. The heat capacity does not depend on the mass.
SI units J kg -1 K -1 J / K

What is specific heat?

Specific heat is very similar to heat capacity as they both involve bringing a unit of temperature rise into a body, although it becomes different with the latter as it has an additional variable, ‘Mass’ to be noticed while noticing. that unit of temperature rise. The specific heat of water is 4.186 Jg -1o C -1, in simple words we can say that to make the increase of 1 o C in 1 gram of water we need 4.186 Joule of thermal energy. The relationship between heat and temperature can be expressed as:

Q = cm ∆T,

where,
Q is added heat
C is specific heat
∆T is temperature change

The relationship is no longer valid when a phase change is found, it means conversion of water into a gaseous state (boiling point) or when ice turns into a liquid state (melting point. It is because the heat removed or added during the change phase does not bring change in temperature When it comes to theoretical or laboratory work, specific heat is used instead of heat capacity as it also measures the mass of the substance or object.

What is heat capacity?

Heat capacity is the amount of heat required to increase the temperature of a substance to 1 degree Celsius (° C) or 1 Kelvin. The attracted heat or the increase in temperature has nothing to do with the mass of the substance. Thermal energy is directly proportional to temperature, which means that the increase in temperature will automatically cause an increase in thermal energy within the body and vice versa. Heat capacity can be defined using this equation:

C = ∆Q / ∆T,

Where,
Δ Q is the amount of heat added
C is the specific HEAT

READ   Difference between Absorbance and Transmittance

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«> Δ T is the change in temperature

Specific heat versus heat capacity

  • Heat capacity is the amount of heat necessary to increase the temperature of a substance to 1 degree Celsius (° C) or 1 Kelvin, while specific heat is the amount of heat necessary to increase the temperature of a substance that has a mass of 1 kg or 1 g in 1 grade. Celsius (° C) or 1 Kelvin.
  • Specific heat is directly proportional to the mass of the object or substance, while the heat capacity does not depend on the mass.
  • J / K is the SI unit of heat capacity, while J kg -1 K -1 is the SI unit for specific heat.

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