Difference between osmotic and oncotic pressure

Key difference

Both pressures, osmotic pressure and oncotic pressure, are interrelated, one who is willing to understand both terms must understand the process of osmosis. What is the basis of both pressures and also plays a fundamental role in living organisms, where the transport of water and other molecules occurs through membranes such as caterpillars and arteries. Osmosis is the process in which solvent molecules pass through a semi-permeable membrane from a less concentrated solution into a highly concentrated solution. Next, the osmotic pressure is the minimum pressure required to stop the solvent flow inward through a semi-permeable membrane, on the other hand, the oncotic pressure also known as colloid osmotic pressure, It is the type of osmotic pressure in which albumin and plasma proteins in a blood vessel apply pressure to carry water to the circulatory system. Osmotic pressure and oncotic pressure are discussed here with respect to biological movement in the body. Together, both terms are called “Starling forces” as they govern the passive exchange of water between capillary microcirculation and interstitial fluid.

Comparative chart

Osmotic pressure Oncotic pressure
Definition Osmotic pressure is the minimum pressure required to stop solvent flow inward through a semipermeable membrane. Oncotic pressure, also known as colloid osmotic pressure, is the type of osmotic pressure in which albumin and proteins in the plasma of a blood vessel apply pressure to bring water into the circulatory system.
Measured using Osmometer Oncometer
Factors The osmotic pressure is directly proportional to the temperature and the concentration of solute in the solution. Oncotic pressure is directly proportional to the number of colloids in a solution.

What is osmotic pressure?

Osmotic pressure is the external pressure that is required to prevent solvent flow into the solution separated by the semipermeable membrane. To have the real feeling that this pressure is exerted on the solution, one must know the osmosis process in which solvent molecules pass through a semi-permeable membrane from a less concentrated solution into the highly concentrated solution. The Pleffers method and the Berkeley and Hartley method are the most famous methods for determining osmotic pressure, although now, in modern times, a device known as an osmometer is also used to determine osmotic pressure. The osmotic pressure is directly proportional to the temperature and the concentration of solute in the solution, while it is inversely proportional to the volume of the solution. Solutions based on atmospheric pressure can be divided mainly into these three types: 1) Isosmotic solution: The atmospheric pressure of the solution is equal to the surrounding pressure. 2) Hyperosmotic solution: The atmospheric pressure of the solution is higher than that of the environment. 3) Hypoosmotic solution: The atmospheric pressure of the solution is lower than that of the environment.

What is oncotic pressure?

Oncotic pressure, also known as colloid osmotic pressure, is specifically the type of pressure in biological fluids. In addition, it is the type of osmotic pressure in which albumin and proteins in the plasma of a blood vessel apply pressure to bring water into the circulatory system. It is actually the pressure that adds up to osmolality with the presence of colloids present in a solution. Oncotic pressure is the form of osmotic pressure that is required to prevent colloidal osmotic flow in the body. This pressure plays a fundamental role in maintaining the water balance of body tissues. In an animal body, proteins and albumin are responsible for most of the oncotic pressure, since in the capillaries of blood plasma, albumin conducts 75% of the total oncotic pressure.

Osmotic pressure vs. oncotic pressure

  • Osmotic pressure is the minimum pressure required to stop solvent flow inward through a semipermeable membrane; On the other hand, oncotic pressure, also known as colloid osmotic pressure, is the type of osmotic pressure in which albumin and blood proteins apply pressure. plasma from the glass to carry the water into the circulatory system.
  • The Pleffers method and the Berkeley and Hartley method are the most famous methods for determining osmotic pressure, although now, in modern times, an apparatus known as an osmometer is also used to measure osmotic pressure, while oncotic pressure is measured by oncometer.
  • Osmotic pressure is directly proportional to the temperature and concentration of solute in solution, while oncotic pressure is directly proportional to the number of colloids in a solution.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button