Society

Differences between Developed and Underdeveloped Countries

For some it is evident that there are great differences between developed and underdeveloped countries, which are due not only to the economic factor but also to a series of internal and external factors that lead the population to reach different degrees of social organization with structures. differentiated productive activities and, consequently, with quite different standards of living in general terms.

That said, it is very common to talk about developed and underdeveloped countries, but many times we do not know the fundamental characteristics of each one of them. In this sense, we will point out in this article the characteristics that differentiate developed countries from underdeveloped countries for the consideration of readers.

Developed countries

Basically, developed countries are those that have achieved a prosperous economic status through the employment and exploitation of their natural, technological and human resources and that have high concentrations of capital and technology, as well as a high standard of living.

Among some specific characteristics of developed countries we can find:

  • A high income per capita, that is, high average income per person.
  • A powerful and technologically advanced industry.
  • A high standard of living that is reflected in the development of infrastructure.
  • Public services (health, educational, cultural, sports…) of high level and quality.
  • Modern and sufficient roads and means of transport and communications.
  • Population growth is usually slow or moderate (1% and even less), with a low or moderate birth rate and low mortality.

To conclude, in developed countries food is usually good in quantity and quality, even presenting overfeeding of the population. Apart from this, a high cultural and educational level is usually evidenced in the development of science, technology, arts and various trades. Among some developed countries we can mention Spain, Japan, United States, France, Norway, Australia, among others.

Underdeveloped countries

We can say that the underdeveloped or developing countries are those that use their natural and human resources for economic purposes to a very limited degree, this is due to the lack of capital, technical means, specialized personnel, administrative mechanisms and incentives to the working population. Thus, among some characteristics of underdeveloped countries we can mention:

  • A low income per capita, that is, low average income per person.
  • Little and insufficient industrial development that often depends on foreign investment.
  • A low standard of living that is reflected in poor infrastructure.
  • Public services (health, educational, cultural, sports…) of very low level and quality.
  • Precarious and insufficient roads and means of transport and communications.
  • A demographic growth that is usually high (between 2.5 and 3%).
  • High or moderate birth and mortality rates (especially infants).

In addition to this, in underdeveloped countries, food is usually of low quality, showing insufficient daily ration per person, with high degrees of malnutrition, especially in children, and undernourishment in the adult population.

Finally, a low educational and cultural level is observed, which is manifested in high levels of illiteracy as well as a precarious development of sciences, arts and trades. Among some underdeveloped countries we can mention Nigeria, Nepal, Paraguay, Angola, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Haiti.

According to what is cited in the previous definitions, the most outstanding differences between developed and underdeveloped countries are:

Developed countries Underdeveloped countries
They have a high per capita income They have a low per capita income.
They have a powerful and technologically advanced industry. They have little and insufficient industrial development.
They have public services of high level and quality. They have low level and quality public services.
Good food in quantity and quality. Low quality food, with high degrees of child malnutrition and undernourishment in the adult population.
A high educational and cultural level with high development of science, technology, arts and various trades. Low educational and cultural level with high levels of illiteracy and a precarious development of sciences, arts and trades.
Slow or moderate population growth. High population growth.
Low or moderate birth and death rates. High or moderate birth and death rates.

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