Difference Between Developed and Developing Countries

Main difference

The United Nations (UN) classifies countries based on their economic condition, industrialization, employment-poverty rate, GDP, GNP, and standard of living. The countries on the basis mentioned above are mainly divided into categories such as developed countries, developing countries, economies in transition, and fuel exporting countries. Two of the world’s leading economies are developed and developing countries. As both words say that one shows the achievement mark of development and the other refers to the journey en route to obtaining the status of developed. Developed countries are the countries that have a higher standard of living, a higher per capita income level, and stability in their economic condition. On the other hand, Developing countries are the countries that have a moderate standard of living, low level of per capita income with the slow pace of industrialization. Infant mortality, death rate and birth rate are quite high in developing countries while developed countries have elite facilities and have a higher life expectancy rate.

Comparison chart

Developed countries Developing countries
Definition Developed countries are the countries that have a higher standard of living, a higher per capita income level, and stability in their economic condition. Developing countries are the countries that have a moderate standard of living, a low level of per capita income and the slow pace of industrialization.
Unemployment and poverty rate Under High
Income Developed countries generate income through the industrial sector. Developing countries fill their banks through their agriculture and service sectors.
Economic growth Developed countries have stable economic growth and do not depend on others. Directly or indirectly, developing countries depend on developed countries for economic growth.
Standard of living High Under
Mortality, birth and infant mortality rates Under High
examples Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, France, Germany and Italy. India, Kenya, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Turkey.

What are developed countries?

Developed countries refer to the countries that already have massive development in terms of their economy, education, employment, sense of security. Compatriots from developed countries enjoy a higher level of per capita income and have more stability in their economic sector. In other words, developed countries are also called “post-industrial country” and “first world country”. The income of these countries does not depend on the agricultural sector, since they have a highly modernized industrial sector that generates most of the money. Developed countries have a higher Human Development Index (HDI), GDP and GNP, and a higher level of per capita income. That means that the people of the developed countries are well insured economically and a sudden collapse in their economy cannot happen, since they are not the fuel exporting countries or the countries that depend on agriculture. Apart from that, developed countries have a higher standard of living in terms of education, medical facilities and they also have a higher rate of life expectancy. Infant mortality, death rate and birth rate are quite low compared to less developed or developing countries.

What are developing countries?

Developing countries refer to countries that are in the process of developing. Its GDP, the level of income per capita is much higher than that of poor countries and, at the same time, it is very low than that of developed countries. According to the UN , a developing country is a country with a relatively low standard of living, an underdeveloped industrial base, and a moderate to low human development .Index (HDI). Developing countries are the most dependent on the agricultural or service sectors for income and do not have a very stable economy. The living conditions vary from low to moderate, and the unequal distribution of income are the other characteristics of these countries. Directly or indirectly, developing countries depend on developed countries for their economic growth. Developing countries have a low life expectancy rate and a higher birth and death rate. The infant mortality rate in developing countries is also higher compared to developed countries as the facilities are insufficient in the health sector and unemployment and poverty are more at the same time.

Developed vs. Developing Countries

  • Developed countries are the countries that have a higher standard of living, a higher per capita income level, and stability in their economic condition. On the other hand, developing countries are the countries that have a moderate standard of living, low per capita income level with the slow pace of industrialization.
  • The unemployment and poverty rate is quite low in developed countries compared to developing countries.
  • Developed countries generate income through the industrial sector, while developing countries fill their banks through their agriculture and service sectors.
  • Developed countries have stable economic growth and are not dependent on others, while directly or indirectly developing countries depend on developed countries for economic growth.
  • The standard of living is quite high in developed countries as they have an equal distribution of income, while the standard of living in developing countries is low to moderate due to unequal distribution of income.
  • Infant mortality, birth rate, and death rate are low in developed countries, and at the same time, they have a higher life expectancy rate.

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