Difference Between Addition Reactions and Substitution Reactions

Main difference

The main difference between addition reactions and substitution reactions is that addition reactions are defined as reactions that require two or more reactants or functional groups, while substitution reactions are defined as reactions that involve the replacement of one functional group or one atom with the other functional. group or atom.

Addition Reactions vs. Substitution Reactions

Addition reactions refer to the presence of more than two functional or reactive groups, while substitution reactions refer to the replacement of one functional group or atom by the other functional group or atom. In addition to reactions, no by-product is produced whereas, in substitution reactions, a by-product is always produced. In addition to the reactions, there is no leaving group whereas in the substitution reactions, the leaving group acts as a by-product. In addition to reactions, the molar mass of the product is always greater than the molar masses of the reactants, whereas, in substitution reactions, the molar mass of the product may or may not be greater than the molar masses of the reactants. In addition to the reactions the molar masses of the product depend on the molar mass of the reactants, whereas in substitution reactions, the molar masses of the product depend on the molar mass of the substituted group. In addition to the reaction, the number of bonds in the adduct is less than the number of bonds in the reactants, whereas, in substitution reactions, the number of bonds in the product and reactants remain the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond while, in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. It is not necessary for the reactants to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. It is not necessary for the reactants to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the reactants must not have a double or triple bond. the number of bonds in the product and the reactants stay the same. In addition to reactions, the reactants are required to have unsaturation, whereas, in substitution reactions, the reactants are not required to have unsaturation. In addition to reactions, the reactants must have a double or triple bond, while in substitution reactions, the reactants must not have a double or triple bond.

Comparison chart
addition reactions Substitution reactions
Addition reactions defined as reactions that require two or more reactants or functional groups. Substitution reactions defined as reactions involving the substitution of one functional group or atom for the other functional group or atom.
By-product
no by-product By-product always formed
molar masses
The molar masses of the product were always greater than those of the reactants. The molar masses of the product may or may not be greater than those of the reactants.
multiple bonuses
Must have a double or triple bond Must not have a double or triple bond
Number of product links
Number of product bonds always less than reactants Number of product vouchers does not vary
examples
Halogenation, hydrogenation, free radical mechanism, etc. electrophilic substitution, nucleophilic substitution, etc.

What are addition reactions?

Addition reactions are reactions defined as the type of reactions that always require the presence of more than two reactants or functional groups. These reactive and functional groups add to each other to produce an adduct that is the result of the addition of both reactants. Addition reactions involve the presence of multiple bonds. Multiple bonds such as double bond and triple bond must be present in the reactants. No by-products are formed during the entire process. In fact, there is also no leaving group in addition reactions. The molar masses of the product are always greater than the molar masses of the reactants. It is due to the product formed by the addition of both reactants. The number of bonds in the product is always less than the number of bonds in the reactants. The reactants must have unsaturation. The functional groups are actually involved in the formation of the addition product.

Classification
  • electrophilic addition
  • nucleophilic addition
  • Addition of free radicals, etc.

What are substitution reactions?

Substitution reactions are the type of reactions that refer to the replacement of one functional group or atom by the other functional group or atom. In this process, the nucleophile attacks the substrate molecule and replaces the leaving group as the product. In this process, the leaving group leaves the substrate molecule as a byproduct. In substitution reactions, the reactants do not have to have multiple bonds, such as a double bond or a triple bond. The presence of unsaturation is not necessary for substitution reactions. The by-product formed during the entire process. The molar mass of the product may or may not be greater than that of the reactants. The molar masses of the product always depend mainly on the product substituted.

Classification

  • electrophilic substitution
  • Nucleophilic substitution
  • Radical substitution, etc.

Key differences

  1. Addition reactions are the type of reactions that are defined as the combination of more than two functional groups, while substitution reactions are the type of reactions that are defined as the substitution of one functional group or atom for the other group. functional or an atom.
  2. Furthermore, the reactions did not form by-products, whereas substitution reactions always formed by-products.
  3. In addition to reactions, reactants must have multiple bonds, whereas, in substitution reactions, reactants must not have multiple bonds.
  4. In addition to reactions, the number of bonds in the product is less than the number of bonds in the reactants, whereas, in substitution reactions, the number of bonds in the product is equal to the number of bonds in the reactants.
  5. Also, reactions, reactions do not have a leaving group whereas, in substitution reactions, reactions have a leaving group as a by-product.
  6. In addition to reactions, the molar mass of the product is always greater than the molar masses of the reactants, whereas, in substitution reactions, the molar mass of the product may or may not be greater than that of the reactants.

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